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The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants

RRP $583.99

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The European Garden Flora is the definitive manual for the accurate identification of cultivated ornamental flowering plants. Designed to meet the highest scientific standards, the vocabulary has nevertheless been kept as uncomplicated as possible so that the work is fully accessible to the informed gardener as well as to the professional botanist. This new edition has been thoroughly reorganised and revised, bringing it into line with modern taxonomic knowledge. Although European in name, the Flora covers plants cultivated in most areas of the United States and Canada as well as in non-tropical parts of Asia and Australasia. Volume I contains accounts of all the Monocotyledons, which includes those groups known informally as the 'petaloid monocotyledons' (the Liliaceae and Amaryllidaceae in the first edition, divided here among 17 families), the grasses and sedges (Gramineae and Cyperaceae), the aroids (Araceae) and the large and diverse Orchidaceae.


The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants

RRP $583.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

The European Garden Flora is the definitive manual for the accurate identification of cultivated ornamental flowering plants. Designed to meet the highest scientific standards, the vocabulary has nevertheless been kept as uncomplicated as possible so that the work is fully accessible to the informed gardener as well as to the professional botanist. This new edition has been thoroughly reorganised and revised, bringing it into line with modern taxonomic knowledge. Although European in name, the Flora covers plants cultivated in most areas of the United States and Canada as well as in non-tropical parts of Asia and Australasia. Volume 4 contains accounts of 82 families, mostly rather small, but including the Primulaceae (with Primula as its largest genus) and Ericaceae (with Rhododendron, the largest genus in the Flora).


The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: V. 1

RRP $910.99

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The European Garden Flora is the definitive manual for the accurate identification of cultivated ornamental flowering plants. Designed to meet the highest scientific standards, the vocabulary has nevertheless been kept as uncomplicated as possible so that the work is fully accessible to the informed gardener as well as to the professional botanist. This new edition has been thoroughly reorganised and revised, bringing it into line with modern taxonomic knowledge. Although European in name, the Flora covers plants cultivated in most areas of the United States and Canada as well as in non-tropical parts of Asia and Australasia. Volume I contains accounts of all the Monocotyledons, which includes those groups known informally as the 'petaloid monocotyledons' (the Liliaceae and Amaryllidaceae in the first edition, divided here among 17 families), the grasses and sedges (Gramineae and Cyperaceae), the aroids (Araceae) and the large and diverse Orchidaceae.


Directions In Tropical Agroforestry Research

RRP $49.95

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Large areas of the warm, humid tropics in Southeast Asia, the Pacific, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa are hilly or mountainous. Jackson and Scherr (1995) estimate that these tropical hillside areas are inhabited by 500 million people, or one-tenth of the current world population, many of whom practice subsistence agriculture. The region most affected is Asia which has the lowest area of arable land per capita. Aside from limited areas of irrigated terraces, most of the sloping land, which constitutes 60% to 90% of the land resources in many Southeast Asian countries, has been by-passed in the economic development of the region (Maglinao and Hashim, 1993). Poverty in these areas is often high, in contrast to the relative wealth of irri- gated rice farms in lowland areas that benefited from the green revolution. Rapid population growth in some countries is also exacerbating the problems of hillside areas. Increasingly, people are migrating from high-potential lowland areas where land is scarce to more remote hillside areas. Such migra- tion, together with inherent high population growth, is forcing a transforma- tion in land use from subsistence to permanent agriculture on fragile slopes, and is creating a new suite of social, economic, and environmental problems (Garrity, 1993; Maglinao and Hashim, 1993).


Wild Edible Plants Of Texas

RRP $19.95

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Designed as a light-weight and field-portable reference booklet, Wild Edible Plants of Texas highlights the Lone Star State's most important edible wild plants. To the point and understandable, this guide best suits the prepper or outdoor enthusiast in need of a salient introduction to the field. No fluff. Just the facts.Each of the 62 entries are comprised of the following sections: Range and Habitat, Edible Uses, Medicinal Uses (when applicable), Cautions, and Special Notes. Both common and scientific names are listed. Over 130 color photos assist in identification and in many cases showcase each plant's choice edible part. Every profile is assigned a Texas-only location map and a seasonal guide on the best harvesting time. A general index is included as are a dozen photos of the state's poisonous plants.Some of the entries have a greater-than Texas range, however many are uniquely Texan, and hail from a specific region. West Texas' Chihuahuan Desert, the Hill Country of the Edwards Plateau, the Plains of the Panhandle, and the Piney Woods and Swamplands of the state's Coastal Plain all are botanically represented.The following plants are covered: Agave, Algerita, Amaranth, Arrowhead, Bastard Cabbage, Black Cherry, Blackberry, Bumelia, Cattail, Cholla, Dayflower, Devil's Claw, Dewberry, Dock, Dwarf Palmetto, Elder, Flameflower, Graythorn, Ground Cherry, Hackberry, Hickory, Indian Strawberry, Jewels of Opar, Kudzu, Lambsquarters, Lemonade Berry, London Rocket, Lotus, Madrone, Mallow, Mesquite, Mulberry, Nettle, Oak, Passionflower, Pawpaw, Pecan, Pennywort, Persimmon, Pokeweed, Prickly Pear, Purslane, Redbud, Rusty Blackhaw, Sorrel, Sow Thistle, Spring Beauty, Sugarberry, Thistle, Turk's Cap, Walnut, Wild Gourd, Wild Grape, Wild Oats, Wild Onion, Wild Plum, Wild Sunflower, Winecup, Yellow Nutsedge, Yucca (Fruit), Yucca (Stalk), and Yaupon Holly.



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Plants Books

Wild Plant Garden Plants Indoor Plants Bonsai Trees
Tropical Plants House Plants Saltwater Plants Greenhouse Plants
Flower Plants Outside Plants

Plants